Oversight of HMRC soft-law: lessons from the Ombudsman

My latest article entitled ‘Oversight of HMRC soft law: lessons from the Ombudsman’ has just been published in the Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law. There is a link to the published version here. The article seeks to set out the important contribution that the Ombudsman has played in the past in respect of overseeing HMRC guidance. The abstract reads as follows:

“An investigation of the role which the Ombudsman plays in tax law, on which comparatively little has been written, reveals that the body makes an important and distinct contribution. There is now almost universal acceptance that tax law is overly complex and indeterminate. If the primary law offers few answers to the taxpayer, then HMRC’s role as administrator of the system becomes apparent. Soft law elaborating upon how HMRC will apply the primary law to a given class of taxpayers is rendered indispensable. In practice however, HMRC soft law has often been found to be deficient. Analysis of the current oversight arrangements for HMRC soft law immediately reveals the genesis of these issues. Select committees exercise Parliamentary control, whilst an independent body performs external audits. These entities however only incommensurately examine the soft law. Into this void steps the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman, a body which has ‘carved for itself a distinctive niche’ in the public law framework. The paper accordingly seeks to elaborate upon the important role that the Ombudsman plays in scrutinising HMRC soft law and the lessons which can be derived from this analysis.”

A previous version of the article is now also available for free on my SSRN page.

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About taxatlincolnox

Tax PhD candidate, College Lecturer and Tutor at Oxford University; Researcher at King's College London and Social Sciences Tutor with the Brilliant Club. With this blog, I seek merely to contribute to the debate. All thoughts are mine, of course.
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